Future job and skills outlook poll

WEF carried out a global poll of 11,000 young people on future skills using u-report platform.

WEF Youth Perspectives

I wish life was a game which came with instructions, but unfortunately we don’t have that roadmap that can tell us exactly what we should do to get to where we want to be.

Praise Majwafi, 22, South Africa
  • 63% believe, given the current economic and social changes, they will have the career that they want in the future?
  • 30% can’t afford training and its their biggest barrier to develop the skills they need to pursue career aspirations.
  • In Australia, which was a small sample size – don’t know what skills they need came up top.
  • 32% job ready skill program and 28% access to on the job training would make the most difference to achieve their career goals. Thats also reflected in Australia’s small sample.

Its worth checking out the knowledge graphs – you have to create a WEF account for free, as well as easily accessible ureport

#education #skillsofthefuture # #training

Radical Thinking for Equitable Futures

IDEO and Imaginable Futures attempt to provide an accessible global viewpoint on disruption in the education sector and potential ways to mitigate future impact.

IDEO and Imaginable Futures attempt to provide an accessible global viewpoint on disruption in the education sector and potential ways to mitigate future impact.

Unfortunately it’s scope is limited. For example I didn’t see mention of higher education, vocational education or lifelong learning so learning re-imagined, though a worthy browse doesn’t provide as holistic a view of the complex education and employment ecosystems.

Its signals or examples do offer useful anecdotes of how some issues are being addressed. More research, a key part of design thinking, to ensure that it was tackling the right disruptive trends in education would have helped this report considerably.

“Radical Thinking for Equitable Futures” claims heights it simply does not reach but at least its attempted to ask some important questions – how is education likely to be disrupted and can we be better prepared? Its certainly worth flicking through and you’re likely to get something out of it but probably not as much as you hoped.

https://www.imaginablefutures.com/learning-reimagined

The New Work Standard

Photo by Noelle Otto on Pexels.com

Foundation of Young Australian’s new report asks what is good work in an increasingly deregulated job market and makes policy suggestions to turn that around.

FYA looks at what part time, casual, self-employed and gig work – or flexible work – means for young people, their livelihoods and careers.

The future looks bleak for many and we cant rely on free markets alone to to create new jobs. We’ll end up with generations of young people not living up to their potential or be given the opportunities that they deserve in life. Unless good work can be created by government backed up with training pathways for skills of the future. Lets give our children a future they deserve.



#futureofwork #skillsofthefuture #NewWorkStandard

Better insights not revolution in the education sector

If 73 senior professors wrote me a letter I would listen as we simply cannot afford to get this wrong.

The governments well intentioned objective is to “...better align Commonwealth funding to emerging labour market priorities, including nursing, health occupations, teaching and IT“.

Surely providing student more data and insights on skills of the future, occupation pathways, employability and revenue potential would surely have been a less drastic starting point? Ultimately better informed students would vote with their feet and we would achieve the same outcome while remaining true to open market principles.

#educationindustry #educationreform #skillsofthefuture

https://newsroom.unsw.edu.au/news/general/open-letter-australias-education-minister-dan-tehan-%E2%80%94-signed-73-senior-professors

The road to open badges and microcredentials

Open badges and microcredentials with their focus on competency-based recognition rather than time spent learning will become important foundations for rebuilding our economy and equipping people with the skills of the future.

Open badges and microcredentials with their focus on competency-based recognition rather than time spent learning will become important foundations for rebuilding our economy and equipping people with the skills of the future. They won’t help institutions to figure out what should be in a course but they standardise a way of displaying it with key metadata including links to evidence.

The highly visual nature of open badges, especially when designed well, gives more faith to future employers on the skills of the badge recipient.

Its still a confusing field.

The following article is a great overview for educators looking to for a practical understanding of this emerging field and ecosystem.

http://www.irrodl.org/index.php/irrodl/article/view/4529

Kyle Clements, Western Governors University

Richard Edward West, Brigham Young University

Enoch Hunsaker, Brigham Young University

#openbadges #openeducation #skillsofthefuture #digitalbadges #educationinnovation

The empty classroom

The empty classroom by Vinod Ralh
Photo by Barry Zhou on Unsplash
Tables of stature half height
Dust settling on mornings glow
Chairs tucked in 
Uncharacteristically 
For once 
Lined in a row.

Silence deafeningly unnatural 
Fills the room
Remnants of children's laughter 
Echo
Poignant reminders
Remnants that reverberate
Faint shadows.

Dusk pervades the classroom
Teachers weep at time now frozen
As a generation now chilled
For their time has been stolen
Lives full of promise 
Unfulfilled 
Remain on hold.

JobTrainer 2Bn investment

An additional $2Bn for training and re-skilling is certainly a welcome announcement by federal government as well the additional $500M from states. It does require states to sign up to much needed reform – but thats not such a bad thing in an overly complex vocational education sector.

A question remains on course completion rates – how will we encourage people to not just start courses but also successfully complete them. Where courses are completely digital that is less of an issue as production costs are a one off. But if they need online trainers or in location training that can become an expensive issue. So how do we equip learners with the knowledge to pick the right courses, ones they are likely to complete and also provide them viable skills of the future in in demand industries? There needs to be a carrot and not just a stick approach.

Perhaps processes such as those provided by Khan Academy for teachers to monitor progress of student classes gives us a clue on how this can be done at scale?

For professionals looking at short courses – subsidies to global providers such as Linkedin Learning, Udemy, Coursera, Edx, Pluralsight, SkillsShare and others – would be a valuable additional option to locally created short courses. A small monthly sum typically provides access to 1000’s of courses and for large cohorts of self-sufficient people, that’s probably all they really need.

An elephant remain firmly planted in the centre of the room. Training alone will never be enough as people need ultimately jobs. Waiting for industry alone to create jobs will simply take too long and a large pool of unemployed and underemployed already exists. A generation’s talent will be wasted unless more is done.

Coalition to commit $2bn for training if states agree to overhaul of vocational education – The Guardian

https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2020/jul/16/coalition-to-commit-2bn-for-training-if-states-agree-to-overhaul-of-vocational-education